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LOLLI
Moderator

Why did you guys start another thread on this haha?   The original thread got moved to the EPIC THREADS forums.

Maybe I need some way of showing users the thread moved?

Original Thread: /thread/21854/The-Oldskool-Series-From-House-to-Hardcore21854
 
tst
2rip
Premium Member
I wanted people to be able to find it in the Music Forum.  If you want to delete the one that got moved to Epic that would be fine by me.  
 
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LOLLI
Moderator
Post from 2ripI wanted people to be able to find it in the Music Forum.  If you want to delete the one that got moved to Epic that would be fine by me.  

no no.  it got moved to epic because so many people liked the thread.  Post in either though, they're both very good threads
 
tst
2rip
Premium Member
Post from LOLLI
no no.  it got moved to epic because so many people liked the thread.  Post in either though, they're both very good threads
haha.  i totally understand that.  i just wanted peeps to be able to see this when they actually go to the music forums to listen to stuff.   :)

 
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2rip
Premium Member
holy shit guys.  i cannot wait to post episode 16.  too bad that one isn't for almost 2 weeks....  BREAKS!!
 
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pablo814
Premium Member
Post from 2ripholy shit guys.  i cannot wait to post episode 16.  too bad that one isn't for almost 2 weeks....  BREAKS!!
Please say u found some old friction n spice cuts.....
 
"Honey, I want to do something, we never do anything!" "We are doing something. I'm watching the game and eating a sandwich, and you are making me another sandwich!"
2rip
Premium Member
Post from pablo814Please say u found some old friction n spice cuts.....
Definitely got some.  In fact I thought they were already featured previously.  If not you can rest assured that some more stuff from them will be showing up - especially when I start hitting on 1996 dnb.

Episode 16 has more shit like the original zone pressings, dust/chemical brothers, crystal method and freestylers.
 
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2rip
Premium Member
Episode #15: Pure Pleasure [1994-1996]


DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-10-28T20_03_49-07_00.mp3

After the 1994 Criminal Justice Act nearly left the British free party scene in ruins many traveler artists moved away from Britain to Europe, United States, Goa (India) and even Australia’s East Coast. The free party ideology spread through Eastern Europe. This period marked the rise in French, German and Dutch sound systems and Teknivals.

A teknival is a free event where any artist who enters is encouraged to participate, often leading to several days worth of randomly placed sound systems, cafes, tents and vehicles. The most famous free party sound system was Spiral Tribe which originated in West London and hosted the Castlemorton Common Festival in 1992 which drew a crowd of 35,000. Some say that this event had a huge impact on the lawmakers to develop the Criminal Justice Act.

The musical background of techno truly resides in Detroit. The blueprint for the entire genre developed from the Belleville Three: Juan Atkins, Kevin Saunderson & Derrick May. Derrick May described techno at one point as “It’s like Detroit. A complete mistake. It’s like George Clinton and Kraftwerk are stuck in an elevator with only a sequencer to keep them company.”

The instruments utilized by the original techno producers in Detroit included drum machines like the Roland TR-808 and bassline generators like the Roland TR-303. The TR-808 was developed to assist artists in making demos of their music and the TR-303 was developed to assist practicing guitarists with bass accompaniment.

A second wave of techno producers soon came onboard. The Belleville crew was joined by artists including Carl Craig, Kenny Larkin and Stacey Pullen. Underground Resistance was also defining their own sound with artists like Jeff Mills, Mike Banks and Robert Hood. UR was a group of artists who viewed themselves as a paramilitary group fighting against commercial mainstream entertainment.

In 1990, Richie Hawtin and John Acquaviva started the Plus 8 record label which was based in Ontario. Many of the initial releases were industrial hardcore recordings. One of their last hardcore pressings was Cybersonik’s “Thrash.” They decided to depart from their hardcore concept when they played a club in Rotterdamn in 1992. The resident dj was playing “Thrash” when the crowd began to yell an anti-semitic football chant. They were prompted to change their musical direction by slowing down their tempos and engaging more funk and soul into their music. The label had eventually taken a sabbatical in 1997 when Acquaviva decided to concentrate on dj’ing and Hawtin began a new label called Minus.

This podcast captures the sounds of various regions that participated in developing the sound of techno as a whole, ranging from Paul Johnson in Chicago to Hardfloor in Germany and Funk D’Void in Barcelona. The timeframe for this music is dated to 1994-1995.

Nerk - Nok 1
Tok Tok - Snack 1
Hardfloor - Into The Nature
Floppy Sounds - Ultrasong
Slam - Positive Education
Robert Hood - Untitled
DJ ESP aka Woody Mcbride - Slow Mo
Christian Vogel - Time
Hardfloor - Beavis At Bat
Paul Johnson - Bouncing Bed Springs
Paul Jonson - Tenacious
Soup - Exposure
Funk D'Void - Jack Me Off
 
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2rip
Premium Member
Episode #16: FANTASTIC VOYAGE


DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-11-06T00_27_53-08_00.mp3

Some Orlando, FL doctors estimate that there were approximately 60+ drug related deaths in the city between 1991 and 1997, many of which were linked to the Orlando rave scene. The city had risen quickly and fell quickly due to the widespread amount of excessive drug use. Heroine was very popular in Orlando during the mid-nineties and was actually so much of a problem throughout the city that the police worked to take control, creating "The Rave Review Board" which would impose a curfew on nightclubs which would end any afterhours activity. Since Orlando raves were always held in nightclubs their scene, knocking out the majority of rave promoters from the city as they began looking to the suburbs.

The beginning of the Orlando rave scene can be traced back to a club called Oz. The main promoter of Oz, Stace Bass, had two major residents: Kimball Collins and Dave Canalte. Dave Canalte eventually became musical director for Disney's Pleasure Island.

DJ Icey's roots date back to the same period but at a club called Sub-Zero where he was growing an appreciation for breakbeats. He soon moved on to play at a club called Edge which was supposed to have a Top 40 theme - but not under Icey's watch. With the club packed every weekend from 1991 to 1997, Orlando was growing on the rave map. But simultaneously the drug situation inside The Edge had gotten out of control. The crowd members were often considered to be "gangster ravers." A backlash to these happenings came from within the scene.

Firestone nightclub opened up in 1994, hosting primarily progressive house acts. Progressive house was considered to be a more mature sound and in clubs like Firestone a dresscode was enforced. A split in the scene had become evident with "Edge kids" on one side wearing JNCO jeans, doing ecstacy or heroine and listening to breaks. The other side were "Firestone clubbers" who were dressing up, doing cocaine and listening to progressive house.

Funky breaks in Florida caught on primarily because it was a fusion of styles. The area was already big on electro. There was also the booty shaking music of Miami bass. Funky breaks combined these two but with more of a rave essence. It was also widely accepted because it sounded like a hip hop version of techno/house. In the early to mid-ninetees you would see breakdancers popping and locking at events.

This podcast presents some popular breaks tracks that were released between 1993 and 1996. It illustrates some Florida breaks like Icee and also the sounds of UK Big Beat producers like The Crystal Method and Chemical Brothers.

2 Bad Mice - Bombscare
DJ Icee - Gotta Get Some
The Freestylers - Don't Stop
DJ Icee - Tricks Theme
Silicon Valley Def Stars - Phat Phuzz
Thursday Club - A Place Called Acid
Lionrock - Packet of Peace (Chemical Brothers Remix)
Anoesis - Trouble Down Groove
The Crystal Method - Keep Hope Alive
Chemical Brothers - Chemical Beats
The Woodshed - Reefaman Cometh

 
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erinette
Member
diggin on this breaks mix!  
 
chicken makes me angry....gRRrRRRrRRR
J
Member
Online
I'd been to firestone several times to catch Jimmy Joslin v Magic Mike sets.  Good times.  

Place called acid is one of my all time favs.

Good stuff chad.
 
2rip
Premium Member
Post from JI'd been to firestone several times to catch Jimmy Joslin v Magic Mike sets.  Good times.  

Place called acid is one of my all time favs.

Good stuff chad.
Did you live in Florida at one point?
 
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2rip
Premium Member
Woot!  I finally managed to wing some phone calls that to my complete surprise had listed Mark E. Quark as the essential founder of the San Diego rave scene.  I definitely had no idea on that one.  He used to play in Pittsburgh back in the day.

I didn't have a chance to speak with him directly but I am now in touch with Todd Zweig who played a major role in the fine tuning of the scene after Mark E. Quark moved to SF in 1992-1993.  The interview should be taking place this weekend.
 
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alucard666
Member
Ive seen Mark E. Quark a couple times but didn't know that^^^^^about him. But he can sure throw down.

Ive been loving this whole thread and the mixes. I like reading about were it all came from.  I mean I know my history but its hard to keep up some times.

Question about Episode 16.
I see nothing about Huda Hudia. Is that cause he might not have been producing at that point? Because I think He played a big role in that scene, or am I mistaken.

Keep it up though! Tis very entertaning.
 
                                                                                                                                                             
2rip
Premium Member
Post from alucard666Ive seen Mark E. Quark a couple times but didn't know that^^^^^about him. But he can sure throw down.

Ive been loving this whole thread and the mixes. I like reading about were it all came from.  I mean I know my history but its hard to keep up some times.

Question about Episode 16.
I see nothing about Huda Hudia. Is that cause he might not have been producing at that point? Because I think He played a big role in that scene, or am I mistaken.

Keep it up though! Tis very entertaning.
Hmmm... Hudia was actually part of the Tampa breaks scene, which did in fact have a strong influence on what became known as Florida breaks.  He started dj'ing in 1990 His label Kaleidoscope Records released over 100 songs.  EA sports also featured "System Overload" on course 1 of SSX Tricky.

I probably should have taken on ALL of the Florida scene but there were too many segments so I just decided to focus on Orlando since it was the most widely publicized due to Icey's penile erectile status (lol)
 
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pablo814
Premium Member
What ever happened to Friction and Spice?
 
"Honey, I want to do something, we never do anything!" "We are doing something. I'm watching the game and eating a sandwich, and you are making me another sandwich!"
2rip
Premium Member
Post from pablo814What ever happened to Friction and Spice?
I don't seem to have anything of theirs.  I can likely track it down.  Going to need more time.  I might go back once the project is done and fill in any blanks.  Or I'll just throw together some newly mixed oldskool sets for your listening pleasure.  I'll be doing a 12 hour marathon set online sometime in january where I'll bust out my ENTIRE collection from the 70's through the 90's.
 
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2rip
Premium Member
Episode #17: Evolutionary Rhythm


DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-11-20T17_14_14-08_00.mp3

Between the year 1995 and 1996 jungle began splitting further into other sub-styles. What was once known as jungle was now being recognized as drum & bass by newcoming fans. During 1995, P-Funk introduced "P-Funk Era" which would revolutionize the sound of drum & bass as many artists began to incorporate more rolling basslines into their production.

During this same year jungle became more commercialized. Though he was mostly intrigued by acid house and Detroit techno, Alex Reece rose to become a very influential name in the jazzy/intelligent drum & bass scene. Although remaining an underground genre, Goldie's "Timeless" sold 150,000 copies in the UK alone. Goldie also formed his label Metalheadz in this time period which signed Doc Scott, Dillinja, and Photek. Intelligent drum & bass was seeing a large popularity while the jungle sound of the early 90's had slowly begun to fade away.

In 1996 Grooverider coined the term "hardstep" for a new wave of drum & bass productions. Hardstep was a move dancefloor oriented style when compared to intelligent drum & bass and the language of the track composition incorporated the same rolling bassline that was becoming widely used in the previous year. From hardstep there immediately came techstep and darkstep.

P-Funk - P-Funk Era
Alex Reece - Pulp Fiction
DJ Pulse - Let You In (Wax Doctor Remix)
88.3 feat. Lisa May - Wishing On A Star
Aphrodite - Wanted It More & More
Richi & Jmj - Free La Funk (Pfm Remix)
Jon The Dentist - France (DJ Trace & Ed Rush Remix)
Roni Size - Secrets
Bigga World - My Perspective
Adam F - Metropolis
Aquasky - Images
 
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Namaste
Newbie
Only had a chance to listen to this most recent one... really groovy shit.  Great stories so far!  
 
2rip
Premium Member
Episode #18: Solar [1994-1996]


DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-12-04T17_14_46-08_00.mp3

In 1994 Paul Oakenfold broadcasted a set on BBC Radio 1's Essential Mix that was largely inspired by beach parties taking place in Goa, India. The two hour mix was seperated into two parts, one half being the Silver Mix and the other being the Gold Mix. This mix was a springboard for many producers such as Li Kwan, Salt Tank & Vanelis.

Around this time the popularity of trance was beginning to rise. During 1994 the trance scene was continuing to develop. Listeners grew increasingly interested in trance not because of the complexity in rhythm but from the complexity in melody & harmony. Many trance songs began to incorporate a method called "gating" which turns the volume up & down rapidly om a rhythm piece to create a stuttered or chopped sound.

Ecstacy had quickly become a primarily trance drug while LSD was also used very frequently in the trance community. The swooping synth patterns and the gated vocals in trance was a stimulating effect while using these drugs. Similarly dancers would take advantage of the breakdowns in trance music to break from dancing and take in long breaths of air. This rushing sensation would then build as the buildups in the music reached their peaking point.

By the mid-90's came the introduction of vocal trance which added vocals and a pop-like structure while producers like Robert Miles were pioneering dream trance. One of the most famous dream trance productions was "Children" by Robert Miles.

Other producers would move in a different direction. DJ Scot Project is often hailed as the founder of hard trance. Hard trance focused on pounding beats and more simplistic synth pads. It also incorporated more of an emphasis on acid sounds. This was taken to the next level with the acid trance genre which actually held more similarities to that of acid techno.

Near the end of the 1990's many of the producers that pioneered the sound of trance had abandoned the genre completely. Oliver Lieb who debuted in 1993 as LSG was one of these producers.

Li Kwan - Point Zero
Luxor - Superstitious (Nursery Mix)
Coloured Vision - Violet Rain
Albion - This Is For
DJ Jamo & Jack Knives - Strings Of Heaven
Skylab - Accident
Scot Project - U (I Got A Feeling)
 
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2rip
Premium Member
Episode #19: Elevate


DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-12-09T21_39_23-08_00.mp3

Rewind to San Diego, 1986. Leading up to this year die-hard San Diego party kids make a 2 hour drive to downtown Los Angeles. Many of the popular Los Angeles parties in the mid-80s were hosted in hotel banquet rooms. One of the most famous was The Park Plaza Hotel. When Todd Zweig went on a trip to Ibiza, Spain that year he had a refreshing musical experience. The massive parties and Balearic dj style ignited his motivation to put an end to the two hour drive to LA and give people in San Diego an event that brings all types of people together under one roof. This was the birth of Playskool.

Playskool, which was eventually renamed Playscool after legal confrontations with the Hasbro Toy manufacturer, was held at Hotel San Diego at Broadway & State Street. During this time the acid house revolution in Europe had not even begun and dj's mostly played artists like The Cure, Aerosmith and Anita Ward. By 1988 Playscool had become so big that Zweig made his first arrangements to use the San Diego Sports Arena.

Zweig had hired George Kreiger who promoted and staged bungee jumping demonstrations for this first event at the Sports Arena. The bungee jumpers were to run across the rafters dressed as police officers and descend upon the crowd as a joke. During practice an operational error took place which led to both jumpers falling to the floor below. No casualties took place but the situation led to a lawsuit which had eventually become case law titled American Casualty vs. Kreiger. After this incident happened in 1987 the decision was made to make Playscool a yearly event.

In 1989, Mark E. Quark was asked to take over Greyboy's "World House" night at Soma on Market Street in San Diego. The event was a copy of Bart Blackstone's "One Nation Under A Groove" events. However the "World House" night came to an end within a couple of months only to re-open shortly afterward with Mark E. Quark as the resident dj, supplied this time with more promotional power. The second run was highly successful with turnouts of 600 - 1000 people per weekend. At this time Quark was mixing between artists like Front 242 and Nitzer Ebb as well as Lords of Acid, Phuture, Lil' Louis and even some disco & funk. However as time pushed on there was less industrial and more acid house being released. While it was new at the time, acid house was positively received in San Diego however it wasn't until he began playing Belgian & Detroit techno around 1990 when people would go completely apeshit for the music.

In 1991 Mark E. Quark was living in a warehouse space at 9th & G St with Brian Weinberg who owned and rented out sound systems for various parties. Brian along with Paul Smith, who was the Playscool arts director, came together as SkinTwo Productions and threw several parties at the warehouse, aptly naming them "Ware's The House." These were some of the first warehouse parties in the city....

CONTINUED...


READ THE FULL STORY BY CLICKING THIS LINK: http://2rip.podomatic.com/entry/2008-12-09T21_39_23-08_00

(Sorry, this story is too big for one post)
 
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J
Member
Online
Post from 2ripDid you live in Florida at one point?
when I was living in North Carolina, I met a friend who was from Daytona...  we'd go down for all the major events and sometimes some of the Liquefied Atlanta shows.  
 
2rip
Premium Member
Episode #20: Vision of Rhythm [1995-1997]


DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-12-22T18_11_01-08_00.mp3

In 1995 a website named Erowid was founded by an organization called “Fire & Earth Erowid.” The site actually remained as a part-time project up until the end of the 90’s. The website specialized in the controversial niche of providing accurate, specific and responsible information about how psychoactives are used around the world. The site soon became a cross between a library and a journal.

During that same year a jewelry maker named John Dwight wrote a letter to the city to request a traffic tunnel to shoot for a “promotional video compilation.” The idea was initially used during the filming of Stephen King’s “The Stand” which took place in Pittsburgh. However, Dwight’s motive was not to simply shoot a video but to throw a party – Tunnelvision. The city approved and this event went down as one of the most legendary parties on the East Coast.

The Tunnelvision party hosted artists like DJ Sun, Speedy J and Dieselboy. The stage was set up with a wall of television sets next to the dj booth and 1500 ravers danced around in baggy clothes. Halfway into the night a large man stripped down naked in the middle of the party and began humping the speakers. He then attempted to charge the television sets next to the booth but was stopped by Joe Lesesne. The naked man was then loaded into a minivan and kept safe for the rest of the night but became an implanted memory for party attendees. Midway into the night, neighbors in the surrounding area began complaining over noise. This sparked media interest. The event hit the news by the next morning and marked as a turning point for the Pittsburgh scene.

In 1994 Fuel Productions, headed by Rick Worth aka Stickman, hosted Synovial Fluid. The event featured Deadly Buda, Ryde, and Dieselfboy. This was one of the largest Pittsburgh raves during that time period. A week after Tunnelvision, Rick Worth hosted a party at the Washington County Fairgrounds. They had forecasted that the party would pull at least 1000 people, however only 300 showed up. This marked Pittsburgh’s first slowdown.

Across the United States in the deserts, Full Moon Gatherings were growing in popularity. Around 1993 a group of individuals had felt that the rave scene was becoming too commercialized. Their inspiration came from the Wicked full moon parties in San Francisco. The first Full Moon Gathering was hosted o in the Lake Castaic region north of Los Angeles. sound system was soon brought into the desert, however the first few events were nothing record-breaking and attendance was low. Soon the crew was completed by DJ Daniel, John Kelley, DJ Brian, Dj Treavor, Petey, Mr. Annand and Tha Roman. In February of 1997 directions were given out over KCRW radio and an attendance of over 2000 showed up for that particular Full Moon Gathering. In the morning of that event, helicopters flew over the party and police in riot gear descended upon the crowd. Following this, Moontribe began making their events more difficult to access by limiting advertisement of events and finding land far away from civilization.

In 1995, however the scene was experiencing a boom coming out of Chicago. Carlos Sosa aka DJ Sneak developed a new sound that would revolutionize house music forever. The disco filtered grooves became Sneak’s signature sound. The new sound would inspire artists such as Daft Punk and Basement Jaxx.

In 1996 people all around the world were taking cues from Chicago house. Boris Dlugosch produced vocal house bomb “Keep Pushin.” At the same time Strictly Rhythm Records had become one of the first dance labels to recognize the value of actively licensingsingles to non-US territories and actively exploited the advantage. The label continued to push out songs regularly, along with Henry Street Music which license The Bucketheadz popular track “The Bomb.”

Armand Van Helden - Mecca Toast
Norty Cotto - Time To Rock A Party
DJ Sneak - Throw Your Hands Up
Da Mongoloids - Spark Da Meth (Bangin Like A Benzi Mix)
Aleem - Filtri Organi
Ruffneck - Everybody Be Somebody
Boris Dlugosch - Keep Pushin' (Pushin Mix)
Freestylers - Don't Stop (Deep Energy Mix)
ATFC - In & Out Of My Life (Lab Rats Dark NIght Vocal)
That Kid Chris - I Believe

 
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Snugz
Member
where's the booty house?  I WANT BOOTY HOUSE

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO DJ FUNK?

i'm typing in caps so people hear me
 
pablo814
Premium Member
Chad you have the most mp3's of any artist in my puter.... that's sayin something...
 
"Honey, I want to do something, we never do anything!" "We are doing something. I'm watching the game and eating a sandwich, and you are making me another sandwich!"
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