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2rip
Premium Member
Episode #3: Rave Krisp-E's



DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-05-24T19_59_59-07_00.mp3

VIEW PODCAST: http://2rip.podomatic.com/entry/2008-05-24T19_59_59-07_00

A lot happened in 1993 from the first Essential Mixes being released on BBC's Radio 1 to the split of oldskool hardcore into two seperate genres: darkcore & happy hardcore. This was also around the time that the San Francisco rave scene was reborn.

San Francisco never jumped onto house music until several years after New York & Chicago. At the turn of the 1990's several English dj's and promoters moved to San Francisco to host events, including a crew called Wicked that hosted the SF Bay Area's "Full Moon" parties. The British invasion lasted until 1993. It was at this point that the Hardkiss Brothers began hosting events and developing the sound for San Francisco ravers. In 1993 Scott Hardkiss produced "Raincry" under the moniker of God Within.

That same year Rabbit In The Moon made their breakthrough debut with O.B.E./Freak To The Beat which came out on Hallucination Recordings. Later that year Phases Of An Out Of Body Experience was released on Hardkiss Records. John Digweed and Nick Muir also established their label Bedrock Records, named after a clubnight in London.

This podcast features some of the biggest, most inspiring progressive and ambient songs from 1993 leading up to a remake of the very first trance recording which was produced in 1990 - The Age of Love.

Rabbit in the Moon - Out of Body Experience
God Within - Raincry
Future Sound of London - Papua New Guinea
Bedrock - For What You Dream Of
Havana - Ethnic Prayer
Grace - Not Over Yet
Unknown - Unknown
Jam & Spoon - Age of Love (Watch Out For Stella Club Mix)


 
www.myspace.com/dj2rip | www.districtignition.com | www.clubglow.com
Human
Member
Sweet Future Sound of London track. I'm a huge fan of We Have Explosive. :D
 
Frankie Bones is the suck you've been looking for
esbeekay
Member
this rly may be the best thread ever on lolli
 
TBOT3001
Member
really excited to hear the newest one.  keep em coming chad!
 
2rip
Premium Member
Post from TBOT3001really excited to hear the newest one.  keep em coming chad!
i was just thinkin about Hardkiss.  anyone see any of the Hardkiss Bros dj lately?  i remember seeing Scott & Gavin at GATEWAY 2: The Other Side in WV back in like 2000.  Loved that shit... with John Acquaviva also on that lineup.  shit yeah.
 
www.myspace.com/dj2rip | www.districtignition.com | www.clubglow.com
DHPfelony
Member
Post from esbeekaythis rly may be the best thread ever on lolli
it is rather EPIC in my eyes

checkin out episode 1 tonite!!!
 
Everybody is a DJ ---> Which in turn makes every girl a whore !!!
TBOT3001
Member
i like the rave krispies one the best so far.  reminds of my raver days
 
2rip
Premium Member
Episode #4: PURE-X - Rave Enhancer



DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-06-23T18_12_05-07_00.mp3

VIEW & COMMENT: http://2rip.podomatic.com/entry/2008-06-23T18_12_05-07_00

By 1990, techno had become a catch-all term denoting anything less traditionally soulful than house music. Hardcore techno was the first fully fledged genre of European rave music. DJ's in Holland were taking techno tracks that were meant to be played on 33 RPM and pumping them up to 45 RPM instead, creating beats that often exceeded 200 beats per minute.

As early as 1989, DJ duo Fabio & Grooverider were experimenting in a similar way. They conducted experiments with house music records that employed breakbeats and sped them up to similar speeds of 200 beats per minute.  They did this with records that had noticeable breakbeats such as music produced on the "Shut Up & Dance" record label and songs like "Humanoid" by Stakker.  This sort of experimentation help pave the way to the rise of UK Hardcore.

UK Hardcore was then influenced by Prodigy's 1991 anthem "Charly" and Acen's 1992 "Trip To The Moon." This new style served as the introductory rave sound in many North American cities. In cities like Chicago & New York the influential sound was house music but in suburban areas and rural towns, hardcore was the first "techno" heard by most people.  And raves soon began cropping up all around the United States, including cities like Pittsburgh, Dallas, and Milwaukee.  By the end of 1993 hardcore fizzled out in most of those towns as their local flavors emerged.

In Canada, Toronto took on an "all hardcore" personality.  Ravers and party promoters essentially copied everything that was going on in England and between 1991 & 1993, England raves were huge on the new hardcore sound.  Don Burns (aka Dr. Trance) had a notion to take raving in a commercial direction with an idea that rave music was for "mass enjoyment."  He wanted to spread culture and did this through the use of Toronto's airwaves.  Burns was a figureman in a seven partner company called Nitrous - the same company that hosted events in the CN Tower and the Ontario Science Museum.  

In 1993 there was a concensus that hardcore was becoming too mainstream as the music was brushing airwaves throughout the US, Canada & Britain. Some producers began to develop what was at the time known as darkcore by stripping the elements of hardcore and making it "darker" with less pitched up vocals. All of the euphoric and happy elements were taken from it. This was the beginning of jungle. In response to this movement a different group of producers took the "happy" elements from oldskool hardcore to create happy hardcore.

With the rise of hardcore came an influx of drug use in the rave culture. The whistles and toys that were first seen in England at Danny Rampling's Shoom events became prominent everywhere hardcore was represented. Children's party accessories like glowsticks were suddenly also very popular and dancers began wearing excessively large T-shirts, wooly hats and children's bookbags.

In 1994 the Criminal Justice Act was passed which led to the crackdown of many illegal raves, outlawing them and preventing a large number of massives from taking place. This law also increased police powers of unsupervised "stop & search" along with an entire section that covered collective trespass & nuisance on land as well as a dedicated section to raves.

This episode is a look at some vital hardcore tunes that were released between 1991-1994.

Tracklisting:

Prodigy - No Good
Codene - Hilton Park
Vol 2 - Turbo Sound
Ramos & Supreme - Crowd Control
Prodigy - Out Of Space
Subdoh - Seduction
Yolk - Bish Bosh
Unknown - Mayday Anthem
Tyrrany - Off Me Head
Unity - Unity (FSOL remix)
 
www.myspace.com/dj2rip | www.districtignition.com | www.clubglow.com
poptart
Member
Chad, you are my hero. :)
 
"And if I was a ghost and came back when u smoked me id rape u" -Flatbed
SheriffKevin
Member
Post from 2ripEpisode #4: PURE-X - Rave Enhancer



DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-06-23T18_12_05-07_00.mp3

VIEW & COMMENT: http://2rip.podomatic.com/entry/2008-06-23T18_12_05-07_00

By 1990, techno had become a catch-all term denoting anything less traditionally soulful than house music. Hardcore techno was the first fully fledged genre of European rave music. DJ's in Holland were taking techno tracks that were meant to be played on 33 RPM and pumping them up to 45 RPM instead, creating beats that often exceeded 200 beats per minute.

As early as 1989, DJ duo Fabio & Grooverider were experimenting in a similar way. They conducted experiments with house music records that employed breakbeats and sped them up to similar speeds of 200 beats per minute.  They did this with records that had noticeable breakbeats such as music produced on the "Shut Up & Dance" record label and songs like "Humanoid" by Stakker.  This sort of experimentation help pave the way to the rise of UK Hardcore.

UK Hardcore was then influenced by Prodigy's 1991 anthem "Charly" and Acen's 1992 "Trip To The Moon." This new style served as the introductory rave sound in many North American cities. In cities like Chicago & New York the influential sound was house music but in suburban areas and rural towns, hardcore was the first "techno" heard by most people.  And raves soon began cropping up all around the United States, including cities like Pittsburgh, Dallas, and Milwaukee.  By the end of 1993 hardcore fizzled out in most of those towns as their local flavors emerged.

In Canada, Toronto took on an "all hardcore" personality.  Ravers and party promoters essentially copied everything that was going on in England and between 1991 & 1993, England raves were huge on the new hardcore sound.  Don Burns (aka Dr. Trance) had a notion to take raving in a commercial direction with an idea that rave music was for "mass enjoyment."  He wanted to spread culture and did this through the use of Toronto's airwaves.  Burns was a figureman in a seven partner company called Nitrous - the same company that hosted events in the CN Tower and the Ontario Science Museum.  

In 1993 there was a concensus that hardcore was becoming too mainstream as the music was brushing airwaves throughout the US, Canada & Britain. Some producers began to develop what was at the time known as darkcore by stripping the elements of hardcore and making it "darker" with less pitched up vocals. All of the euphoric and happy elements were taken from it. This was the beginning of jungle. In response to this movement a different group of producers took the "happy" elements from oldskool hardcore to create happy hardcore.

With the rise of hardcore came an influx of drug use in the rave culture. The whistles and toys that were first seen in England at Danny Rampling's Shoom events became prominent everywhere hardcore was represented. Children's party accessories like glowsticks were suddenly also very popular and dancers began wearing excessively large T-shirts, wooly hats and children's bookbags.

In 1994 the Criminal Justice Act was passed which led to the crackdown of many illegal raves, outlawing them and preventing a large number of massives from taking place. This law also increased police powers of unsupervised "stop & search" along with an entire section that covered collective trespass & nuisance on land as well as a dedicated section to raves.

This episode is a look at some vital hardcore tunes that were released between 1991-1994.

Tracklisting:

Prodigy - No Good
Codene - Hilton Park
Vol 2 - Turbo Sound
Ramos & Supreme - Crowd Control
Prodigy - Out Of Space
Subdoh - Seduction
Yolk - Bish Bosh
Unknown - Mayday Anthem
Tyrrany - Off Me Head
Unity - Unity (FSOL remix)
crowd control is such a fucking tune. its a shame no one plays it.

i have Anabolic Frolic's copy that he used in making Happy 2b Hardcore Chapter 2 lol
 
"I love how exceptionally real you keep it."  - Eric Bliss
rukkus
Member
It is a shame no one plays it but i'm pretty sure few people even have it. I had a copy but i gave it to Virus as a gift. Its pretty rare.
 
SheriffKevin
Member
i love rare records. i'm trying to find a copy of gammer into the night. it was on purple vinyl and came out on warped records but i can't find one anywhere

 
"I love how exceptionally real you keep it."  - Eric Bliss
2rip
Premium Member
Okay, I'm elaborating on a fuckload for the description of the next podcast. We're going to be going a little bit dark for a couple episodes. Bear with me while I get this next one posted! I just want to make sure a few facts are accurate first.
 
www.myspace.com/dj2rip | www.districtignition.com | www.clubglow.com
2rip
Premium Member
Episode #5: Deep Bass Jungle Mix



DOWNLOAD: http://2rip.podomatic.com/enclosure/2008-05-24T19_38_37-07_00.mp3

VIEW & COMMENT: http://2rip.podomatic.com/entry/2008-05-24T19_38_37-07_00

Early jungle evolved from acid house productions that sampled breakbeats. Key acid house tunes during the evolution period from 1989-1992 were 808 State's "Cubik" and Stakker's "Humanoid." Also during the same time Frankie Bones released "Bones Breaks" which was one of the first "breakbeat" productions.

In the early 90's hardcore music was perceived to have become too commercial. Producers like DJ Hype, Mickey Finn, Grooverider & Fabio began stripping down the elements of hardcore, removing the happy elements and replacing them with half-time basslines and multiple break structures. Many productions in this era were also taking samples from horror movies with screaming, yelling and crying sounds. The genre really began to break around the time of 1992. It was still considered hardcore at the time - in fact the term "darkcore" was designated to this style.

Examples of Darkcore are Goldie's "Terminator" (1992) and Top Buzz's "Living In The Darkness" (1992). These tracks took some of their cue from from the darker sounds of Belgium techno - tracks like 4 Hero's "Mr. Kirk's Nightmare" (1990) and The Psychopath's "Nightmare" (1991).

The dark sound appealed to many people in dancehall & reggae communities. The Jamaican "sound system" culture influenced the emerging sound with remixing techniques from dub & reggae. Darkcore & dancehall were being mixed together at parties until soon dancehall reggae was incorporated into the sound of darkcore. As the yet-unnamed genre evolved, the use of sampled breakbeats became more complex. The most notable sample is the Amen Break which was taken from a funk song by The Winston Brothers called "Amen, Brother."


In 1993 the confusion surrounding this style finally broke. Jungle had finally gained it's own identity with dedicated UK club venues such as Roast, Roller Express, and Telepathy. Andy C produced the classic jungle hit "Valley of the Shadows" while Ed Rush formed the darkcore party "Bloodclot Attack."

The origin of the term "jungle" is absolutely debatable. However the emergence of the term can very roughly be traced to Jamaican/Caribbean MC's where they often made references to "the jungle" or "junglists." A junglist was a reference to anyone living in Kingston, Trenchtown - the area that was known as "The Concrete Jungle."

Across the Atlantic, Toronto's hardcore scene began to split as well, creating the largest jungle scene in North America. In London, jungle was a very Black, non-rave sound. The only difference in Toronto was that there was very little Black interest in jungle and the majority stayed away from it. In the United States, Black interest was still primarily focused on the house music scenes of New York & Chicago.

The winter period linking 1992 to 1993 was considered a very "dark" time, especialy for the Toronto rave scene. The overall quality of ecstacy that was being sold was deteriorating, the use of speed was on the rise, and crack was becoming increasingly popular. Overdose cases were becoming far too common in the rave scene while criminality & scamming had also rooted itself in the hardcore arena.

Running parallel to what was happening in the winter of 1992 was Darkcore. In response to darkness that was coming from the UK, other producers of hardcore began moving in the opposite direction. The "happy" elements of hardcore were soon being embellished, creating what has ever since been the arch-nemesis for the jungle community - happy hardcore.

This podcast features some of my early jungle collection with tracks from 1991-1993. For me early jungle was defined by Roni Size & LTJ Bukem. Both of which remained a huge inspiration for me throughout the 1990's which you will see as we near the millenium.

Tracklist:

Rufige Kru - Fabio's Ghost
Q Bass feat. Skeng Gee - Gun Connection
Dubplate Remixes - Simply Rolling
Brainkillers & Lewi Cifer - Hurt Me
Roni Size - Fresh
Ravers Choice - Side B
Roni Size - The Refresher
LTJ Bukem - Bookworm
LTJ Bukem - Logical Progression
David Bryce - Logical Reprise
Bodysnatch - Euphony
Brainkillers & Lewi Cifer - On A Different Mission
Xenophobia - The Phoenix
 
www.myspace.com/dj2rip | www.districtignition.com | www.clubglow.com
pablo814
Premium Member
thanx chad...
 
"Honey, I want to do something, we never do anything!" "We are doing something. I'm watching the game and eating a sandwich, and you are making me another sandwich!"
JohnWayne
Premium Member
Great Job..
 
pablo814
Premium Member
This is still going on. Chad made a new thread in the music section and there are more volumes...
 
"Honey, I want to do something, we never do anything!" "We are doing something. I'm watching the game and eating a sandwich, and you are making me another sandwich!"
pablohassan
Member
Post from pablo814This is still going on. Chad made a new thread in the music section and there are more volumes...
I was like "shit, there's two?!?!"

here's the current thread with the full updates:  http://www.lolli.org/Modules/MessageBoard/Thread.aspx?Thread=22130&Page=1

time to continue downloading!
 
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